Past Events


Agile Product Owner vs. Product Manager

May 07, 2015, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm, Constant Contact, Waltham, MA: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

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BPMA

Topic:

Agile New England and the Boston Product Management Association (BPMA) welcome you to a lively discussion of the roles of the product owner and product manager in Agile development environments. Our panel of experts will explore the overlap and differences between these important roles, and how each can maximize the team'€™s responsiveness to customer needs.

The panel will explore questions like:

Are both roles necessary, or are they really the same job?

How are product manager and product owner responsibilities similar and different in Agile?

How does the product manager role change when an organization transitions to Agile?

What is the right balance between customer interaction and guidance for the development team?

What sort of background and temperament is required for each role?

This will be a joint meeting of Agile New England and the BPMA. Bring your questions about the product owner and product manager roles to this session. Whether you are new to Agile or an expert, please join us in what is sure to be an exciting panel discussion.

About the moderator and panelists:

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Kanban 101 for March 5, 2015
Ajay Reddy

Ajay Reddy

Kanban Foundations: Why Most People Misunderstand what Kanban Really Is

Despite (or perhaps because of) the attention Kanban has received in the blogosphere and other publications, Kanban remains one of the most misunderstood frameworks among technology professionals.  In this session, we’ll engage in a high-level overview of Kanban’s origins and evolutions, underscoring how its current form can help bring new understandings and capabilities to the way we work.

About the session leaders:

Ajay Reddy has coached several teams in Scrumban and Kanban in the last five years. He founded Code Genesys, an Agile-Kanban boutique in 2009 and ScrumDo, a Scrumban tool in 2010, with the express purpose of facilitating Agile implementations. His most recent production is the GetScrumban game has been a valuable learning aid to teach Flow principles to Scrum teams. He is the Chief Product Strategist for ScrumDo.com -now used in 145 countries. Twitter: @ajrdy

Jack Speranza

Jack Speranza

Jack Speranza leads operations for Code Genesys.  In addition to serving as a trainer and coach, Jack’s passionate about maximizing the impact of technology throughout a business.  He’s implemented Kanban as a management framework across non-IT operations, and enjoys contributing to the creation of high-performing organizations.  Jack teaches the Entrepreneurship Capstone at Clark University, and has served on the University’s  Innovation & Entrepreneurship Program Board of Advisors for the past several years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Agile 101 for March 5, 2015
Marina Shalmon

Marina Shalmon

Standup Meeting

  • Short meeting – 15 minutes recommended
  • Three questions
    • What did I do yesterday
    • What do I plan to do today
    • What impediments do I have?
  • Serves as an effective daily synch point
  • Promotes communication
  • Minimizes waste
  • Identifies impediments

About the session leader:

Marina Shalmon is a former President of Agile New England, a Certified Scrum Master (CSM) and an Agile coach with an interest in the human side of Agile. She is the President and Founder of Deep Roots Agile Coaching.


Agile 101 and Kanban 101 courses run from 6:00 to 6:45 during the networking period of the monthly meeting. A sign-up sheet is posted at 5:30 near the check-in table. Capacity is limited to 10 people per class, and sign-up is first come, first served.

 
Agile Portfolio Management - Crossing the Chasm Between Agile Teams and Executive Management: Steve Davi

April 02, 2015, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm,  Constant Contact , Waltham, MA: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

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Steve Davi

Steve Davi

Download the slides

Topic:

Today, it seems that everyone is doing agile; however,the lack of focus on long term planning does not provide the predictability or transparency that executives crave to operate the business. Agile teams and executives agree on faster delivery, lowering costs, and increasing quality but not much else. Agile teams focus on sprints, story points, velocity, and MVP releases while executives focus on costs, efficiencies, timelines, and high-level requirements. Agile teams focus on “how” in sprint increments; executives focus on “what” in 6-12 month horizons. Bringing these two levels of your corporation together is challenging but critical.

Agile portfolio management can solve this issue by ensuring the organization is aligned and on-track without slowing down the pace of delivery or removing the autonomy that keeps your organization competitive. This session will focus on the six (6) key steps that ensure better decisions regarding your agile projects (i.e. better management of your portfolio in an agile environment) and make your portfolio-level decisions as agile as your scrum team decisions. This presentation is targeted to Product Manager, Program Manager, or Executives who want to learn how to manage an agile portfolio and ensure that agile teams are aligned with the overall corporate direction.

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Top 10 Ways to Go from Good to Great Scrum Master: Benjamin Day

March 5, 2015, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm,  Constant Contact , Waltham, MA: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

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Benjamin Day

Benjamin Day

Download the slides

Topic:

The Scrum Master role in an organization can be difficult. You live between a rock and a hard place. You're influential but you probably don't have any real power. You're not a project manager but you're on the hook for delivering. You're asked to promise dates when the best you can give is a forecast. You're long on responsibility and short on power. (Awesome.) But you do it because it's a great job, right? There's nothing like helping your team come together and deliver actual working software.

It takes a special kind of person to be Scrum Master -- Nerves of steel, a lot of finesse, and some ridiculously great people skills. It's a lot of knowing what to look for and knowing how to fix it. Even better if you can anticipate issues and get in front of them. What can you do to help keep everything on track? How do you have the difficult conversations when things are 'sub-optimal'? From that lazy guy on your team, to the Product Owner who doesn't like to estimate, to you losing your mind because you're always picking up the slack. How do you help your team to solve problems and really sing? You're a good Scrum Master. Come find out how to be great.

About the speaker:

Benjamin Day is a consultant and trainer specializing in software best practices using Scrum with Microsoft’s ALM tools. Ben’s main areas of emphasis include Team Foundation Server, Scrum, software testing, and software architecture. He is a Microsoft Visual Studio ALM MVP, a certified Scrum trainer via Scrum.org, and a speaker at conferences such as TechEd, DevTeach, and VSLive. When not developing software, Ben’s been known to go running and sea kayaking in order to balance out his love of cheese, cured meats, and champagne. He can be contacted via http://www.benday.com.

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