About Agile New England

Building a Winning UX Strategy Using the Kano Model: Jared Spool

Dec 03, 2015, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm, VistaPrint/Cimpress, Waltham, MA: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

Jared SPool

Jared Spool

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Topic:

The ultimate goal for user experience is that users enjoy using your product or service. Many companies use satisfaction as a metric for measuring their success. But satisfaction is really just the lack of frustration. You should focus on how you'll delight your users.

Building a roadmap based on product features locks you into a technological solution which may cause problems down the road. However, by shifting your strategy to solve customer problems, the user experience becomes the focus of the design process.

In this session, Jared presents the Kano Model which helps you gauge your users’ expectations. When you approach delight from a perspective of pleasure, flow, and meaning, you can then determine which features meet these objectives.

This talk will show you and your team:

  • How to identify your customers' basic expectations
  • How adding features today creates more work for teams downstream
  • How to focus the team on real customer problems, avoiding the problem of experience rot.

About the speaker:

Jared M. Spool is the founder of User Interface Engineering and a co-founder of Center Centre.

If you’ve ever seen Jared speak about user experience design, you know that he’s probably the most effective and knowledgeable communicator on the subject today. He’s been working in the field of usability and experience design since 1978, before the term "usability" was ever associated with computers.

Jared spends his time working with the research teams at User Interface Engineering, helps clients understand how to solve their design problems, explains to reporters and industry analysts what the current state of design is all about, and is a top-rated speaker at more than 20 conferences every year.

With Dr. Leslie Jensen-Inman, he is starting Center Centre, a new school in Chattanooga, TN to create the next generation of industry-ready UX Designers. In 2014, the school, under the nickname of the Unicorn Institute, launched a Kickstarter project that successfully raised more that 600% of its initial goal.

He is also the conference chair and keynote speaker at the annual UI Conference and UX Immersion Conference, and manages to squeeze in a fair amount of writing time. He is author of the book, Web Usability: A Designer’s Guide and co-author of Web Anatomy: Interaction Design Frameworks that Work. You can find his writing at uie.com and follow his adventures on the twitters at @jmspool.

 

Agile 101 for December 3, 2015

Marina Shalmon

Marina Shalmon

Topic: Scrum 101

In this session we will take a general walkthrough of Scrum and how it aligns with Agile Values and Principles.  This is an overview that will set the stage for deeper exploration in the ensuing sessions.

About the session leader:

Marina Shalmon is a former President of Agile New England, a Certified Scrum Master (CSM) and an Agile coach with an interest in the human side of Agile. She is the President and Founder of Deep Roots Agile Coaching


Agile 101 courses run from 6:00 to 6:45 during the networking period of the monthly meeting. A sign-up sheet is posted at 5:30 near the check-in table. On December 3 capacity is limited to only 5 people per class, sign-up  is first come, first served.

Enterprise Service Planning - Scaling the Benefits of Kanban: David Anderson

Feb 04, 2016, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm,  Constant Contact , Waltham, MA: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

David Anderson

David Anderson

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Topic:

Enterprise Services Planning (ESP) is the future of management for professional services businesses.

Your business is an ecosystem of complex interdependent services. To survive in the fast moving 21st Century, you must create a business that is continually "fit for purpose" with an organizational capability for evolutionary change and adaptation.

ESP enables this new strategy by helping you evolve your network of services and make them fit for purpose. ESP practices help you schedule and sequence work, forecast delivery dates and expected outcomes, allocate capacity, manage dependencies, and manage risk.

About the speaker:

David Anderson is the pioneer of the Kanban Method, as well as Enterprise Services Planning, a system of management for businesses operating in complex environments. He is CEO of Lean Kanban, Inc., a consulting, training and event planning business dedicated to developing and implementing sustainable evolutionary approaches for management of knowledge workers. David has 30+ years experience in high technology and has led software teams using innovative Agile methods at companies such as Sprint and Motorola.

David is the author of Kanban - Successful Evolutionary Change for Your Technology Business; Lessons in Agile Management: On the Road to Kanban; and Agile Management for Software Engineering. You can follow him on Twitter at @lki_dja.

 

Erasing the Artificial Boundaries between “IT” and “The Business”: Bob Fischer

Jan 07, 2016, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm,  Constant Contact , Waltham, MA: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

Bob Fischer

Bob Fischer

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Topic:

What are the things in structure, process and language that lead to the rift between IT and “The Business”? In this session we will look at the causes and consequences of artificial boundaries between IT and business organizations, and what can be done about them.

In theory everyone in an enterprise is aligned toward selling products, delighting the customer, and helping employees evolve their talents. But in reality departments establish their own vision and goals that undermine the alignment, or worse, create actual hostility between IT and the lines of business they support.  

Agile teams often focus on output: getting more and better, faster and cheaper.  What would it be like if the boundaries between IT and business groups were dissolved and the focus became on collectively delivering real value: impact and business outcomes? 

And here’s a question to get you thinking: why is the phrase “The Business” part of the problem?

About the speaker:

Bob Fischer is an organizational agility consultant with Eliassen Group. Previously he was a Vice President at Fidelity Investments, where he was responsible for the deployment of Agile to over 400 people. His activities included coaching at the team and program levels as well as working with functional groups not directly involved in Agile such as Finance, HR, and Process Ownership.    The cultural change included getting agreement between the Business Unit President, CIO, CFO, and the head of Product Development on a common strategy for deploying Agile.  Agile was cited as the key reason a large (over $10 million annual spend) project went from failure to success.  Bob was also an organization-wide catalyst at Fidelity, helping to broaden the deployment of Agile across the larger organization.

As an organizational agility consultant, Bob works with organizations that have found agility to be essential to their ability to survive and thrive in a time of rapid change, technology upheaval, and intense competition.  His systemic approach enables companies to look across their whole organization to envision, design, build and deliver high value products.

 

Kanban 101 for October 01, 2015

Miljan Bajic

Miljan Bajic

Topic: Getting the Most Out of Agile, Scrum, and Lean Kanban

Scrumban is both a mindset and a management framework.

Though a great deal of Scrumban originates from Scrum and the Kanban Method, it’s not a blending of these two frameworks.

It’s Scrum roots inform us on how to structure self-organizing teams, expose organizational dysfunctions, and manage complex undertakings. It’s Kanban roots enable us to acquire and synthesize information that allow for substantially better informed decisions about both the products and services we produce as well as the process we use to produce them. Additional principles stem from understandings rooted in other management sciences.

Since the term was first coined, Scrumban has evolved to a point where it manifests itself in 3 fundamental ways:

  1. As a framework for introducing Scrum to a team or organization;
  2. As a framework for scaling Scrum across an enterprise; and
  3. As a framework for adapting Scrum to better identify, understand and overcome organizational “dysfunctions” that can’t be quickly or easily changed.

About the speaker:

Miljan Bajic is an Agile Coach at Unum Group, where he is responsible for full range of coaching, training, and consulting activities. Miljan is a practitioner and leader in the use of Lean and Agile methods for organizational transformation. As a coach he has worked with teams, individuals and leadership on their Agile transformations, both large and small. He believes that the most important piece of any transformation is to build the skills in the teams to build and continuously improve the process.

Miljan received his bachelor's degree in Computer Information Systems and Communication from the Bryant University and has an MBA in Project Management from the University of Southern New Hampshire. Miljan is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP), a PMI Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP), a Certified Scrum Professional (CSP) and a Certified ScrumMaster (CSM).

Agile 101 for November 05, 2015 (two sessions)

Yuval Yeret

Yuval Yeret

Topic: Cross-Functional Teams

In this session we will explore one of the key ingredients behind Agile's success as well as one of its most disruptive ones - the cross-functional team. We will understand what that actually means, why it is important, look at its implications via some examples from the field, compare Feature teams to Component teams, answer some FAQs as well as specific-context questions you might have about this important topic.

About the session leader:

Yuval is a senior enterprise agility coach at AgileSparks, an international lean agile consulting company with offices in Israel, India, and now in Boston. His client portfolio includes lean/agile initiatives at HP Software R&D, Siemens Manufacturing, Amdocs, Intel, NICE, ICAP, CyberArk, PerfectoMobile and various other smaller enterprises. He is a frequent conference speaker, holds the Lean/Kanban community distinguished Brickell Key Award, is a SAFe Program Consultant, CSM, CSP and CSPO. He is the author of “Holy Land Kanban” and blogs at yuvalyeret.com. Yuval recently moved to the Boston area with his family to lead AgileSparks consulting services in the US. In his spare time he plays volleyball.


Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Topic: Mob Programming

In 2001 Agile was a big answer to the (wrongheaded) idea that cutting testing was the way to save money on software development. Agile fused development and test at the atomic level. Mob Programming fuses learning and doing in a similar way.

This session will be an introduction to Mob Programming through

  • Brief description of what it is and how it started
  • Examples of teams’ experiences using it
  • Honest look at where it catches on and where it doesn’t
  • Open discussion

Mob Programming is a way of doing software programming with the whole team (not more than 6 people) at one computer, all focused on the current bit of coding, and contributing where able. There are some roles: Driver, Navigator, Facilitator, and team member. These roles and the reason for them will be explained.

All the objections to pair programming come into play here, and there are interesting counter-arguments to all of them. There have been no quantitative studies of Mob Programming teams to date, but real teams are using this practice to deliver on real day-to-day work obligations. This session will help you understand what benefits keep them doing this.

About the session leader:

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert is an Agile Enterprise coach and founder of Lean-Agile Partners, Inc. She was among the first to apply Agile methods to embedded systems development, as an engineer, manager, and consultant. She has led Agile change initiatives beyond software development in safety-critical, highly regulated industries, and coached clients in the art of Agile technical and management leadership.

She holds a bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering from Rochester Institute of Technology, and is a founder and past president of Agile New England. Nancy speaks at numerous Agile professional gatherings worldwide, and works with clients aerospace, factory automation, medical devices, defense systems, and financial services.


Agile 101 courses run from 6:00 to 6:45 during the networking period of the monthly meeting.

A sign-up sheet is posted at 5:30 near the check-in table. 

Capacity is limited to 10 people per class, and sign-up  is first come, first served.

Kanban 101 for May 7, 2015

Ajay Reddy

Ajay Reddy

Topic: Kanban Metrics

In this month's session, we will explore Kanban's principles behind why we measure, and the three core metrics new practitioners should embrace as they get started. Led by Ajay Reddy, Chief Product Strategist for ScrumDo.com and Jack Speranza, COO of Code Genesys.

 

About the session leaders:

Ajay Reddy has coached several teams in Scrumban and Kanban in the last five years. He founded Code Genesys, an Agile-Kanban boutique in 2009 and Scrumdo.com, a Scrumban tool in 2010, with the express purpose of facilitating Agile implementations. His most recent production is the GetScrumban game has been a valuable learning aid to teach Flow principles to Scrum teams. He is the Chief Product Strategist for ScrumDo.com -now used in 145 countries. Twitter: @ajrdy

 

 

Jack Speranza

Jack Speranza

Jack Speranza leads operations for Code Genesys.  In addition to serving as a trainer and coach, Jack’s passionate about maximizing the impact of technology throughout a business.  He’s implemented Kanban as a management framework across non-IT operations, and enjoys contributing to the creation of high-performing organizations.  Jack teaches the Entrepreneurship Capstone at Clark University, and has served on the University’s  Innovation & Entrepreneurship Program Board of Advisors for the past several years.

Patterns for Scaling Agile: David Grabel and Monica Yap

Nov 05, 2015, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm,  Constant Contact , Waltham, MA: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

David Grabel

David Grabel

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Topic:

Scaling Agile is risky. No matter what framework you use to scale Agile in a large enterprise, what are the patterns which lead to success, and what are the anti-patterns which lead to disasters? We invite all experienced Agile practitioners to explore and form a list of scaling patterns and anti-patterns. We will share our experience on how to create the successful patterns or avoid/resolve the anti-patterns. This is a highly interactive workshop with a goal to help the Agile community be more successful with enterprise transformations. Attendees can choose to be participants or observers.

Some of the aspects of enterprise transformations to be explored for patterns and anti-patterns include:

  • Large scale planning
  • Geographically distributed teams
  • Agile mind set
  • Agile metrics
Monica Yap

Monica Yap

About the speakers:

David Grabel is a passionate enterprise agile coach. He has introduced Scrum, Kanban, XP, and SAFe to organizations of sizes varying from single team startups to large organizations with over 500 teams. Previous clients include PayPal, Bose, and Trizetto. He helped develop a process for integrating Lean UX design with Scrum delivery teams that was rolled out to 15 Lean UX teams supporting over 100 delivery teams around the world. He is certified as CSM, CSP & SPC and is studying at the Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership. He recently presented a workshop at Agile 2015 on Patterns for Scaling Agile.

David is a past president of Agile New England. He is currently bringing agile beyond engineering at Vistaprint. Previously, he was Vice President of Engineering at Monetrics a startup that was acquired by JM Family Enterprises. Other previous senior management positions include Vice President of Product Technology at Thomson and Vice President of Development at Politzer & Haney.

Monica Yap is an Agile coach at Twitter. She has previously been an Agile coach, Agile trainer, and Agile transformation coach for Agile consulting firms cPrime and SolutionsIQ, working at clients such as Symantec and PayPal. Monica is a regular presenter at conferences, including Agile Conferences, ADP West, and Scrum Gathering.

 

 

Culture for Great Teams and Results: The Core Protocols: Richard Kasperowski

Sep 03, 2015, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm,  Constant Contact , Waltham, MA: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

Richard Kasperowski

Richard Kasperowski

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Topic: Core Protocols are behavior patterns for successful teams.

The Core Protocols are the work of Jim and Michele McCarthy. Over the last 20 years, the McCarthys studied hundreds of teams and thousands of students in a laboratory setting, giving each team a work assignment and deadline of one week to deliver a great product. The McCarthys observed the teams and factored out their success patterns. They encoded these success patterns--behavior patterns of successful teams—as 11 repeatable “protocols”, easy recipes that we can all follow, so we and our teams can reproducibly deliver great products on time every time.

In this presentation, Richard Kasperowski will introduce the Core Protocols. He will share the fundamentals of the Core Protocols and guide attendees through activities that help them learn and retain these same successful behavior patterns. You’ll leave with a better understanding of how to build a team that is in a state of shared vision and can deliver great products on time every time.

About the speaker:

Richard Kasperowski is a cofounder of the Greatness Guild and the author of The Core Protocols: A Guide to Greatness. He works as a Core Protocols trainer and coach, Agile trainer and coach, and Open Space facilitator. He teaches the class, Agile Software Development at Harvard University's Extension School. Read about him at www.kasperowski.com.

 

Agile 101 for October 01, 2015

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Topic: Scaling Agile for Hardware-Software Products

When you attempt to scale your Agile approach beyond software development to cover all of your product technologies for the whole lifecycle, you need answers to key questions like:

  • Doesn't hardware need far longer sprints than Agile allows?
  • Do all teams have to be cross-functional?
  • How do we coordinate among teams on a very large project?
  • Is there a point where the dependencies become unmanageable?

Now it seems that everyone is searching for a way to widen the benefits they've seen from Agile software teams, and they're trying out many different tactics. Agile scaling is not like other business change initiatives where you can paint a clear vision of the goal for everyone to see. We cannot mastermind a complete detailed picture of what our company will be like fully Agile - too many variables! The real question is:

"Can we create an emerging vision along the way that is strong enough to keep the transformation going?"

Nancy V believes that this is possible. We'll take an empirical approach - addressing these questions by looking at real project situations from the instructor's experience and yours.

About the session leader:

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert is an Agile Enterprise coach and founder of Lean-Agile Partners, Inc. She was among the first to apply Agile methods to embedded systems development, as an engineer, manager, and consultant. She has led Agile change initiatives beyond software development in safety-critical, highly regulated industries, and coached clients in the art of Agile technical and management leadership.

She holds a bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering from Rochester Institute of Technology, and is a founder and past president of Agile New England. Nancy speaks at numerous Agile professional gatherings worldwide, and works with clients aerospace, factory automation, medical devices, defense systems, and


Agile 101 courses run from 6:00 to 6:45 during the networking period of the monthly meeting.

A sign-up sheet is posted at 5:30 near the check-in table. 

Capacity is limited to 10 people per class, and sign-up  is first come, first served.

Agile 101 for August 6, 2015

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

 

Topic: Agile is More Than Software

This Agile 101 session is comprised of two modules from a longer workshop that will be offered later this year. These are:

  • Agile Hardware
  • Agile Risk Management

It would seem that “up front” planning is the only way to be thorough and safe in both these areas, but we will show you why that’s not the case.

Using an iterative approach, increasing transparency, and keeping options flexible is a safer, stronger approach in both these areas. We’ll use examples to illustrate why this is true, and why it does not compromise quality in any way. The Agile approach is actually more, not less, compliant with current FDA regulations.

 

Brian Shoemaker

Brian Shoemaker

About the session leaders:

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert is an Agile Enterprise coach and founder of Lean-Agile Partners, Inc. She was among the first to apply Agile methods to embedded systems development, as an engineer, manager, and consultant. She has led Agile change initiatives beyond software development in safety-critical, highly regulated industries, and coached clients in the art of Agile technical and management leadership.

She holds a bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering from Rochester Institute of Technology, and is a founder and past president of Agile New England. Nancy speaks at numerous Agile professional gatherings worldwide, and works with clients aerospace, factory automation, medical devices, defense systems, and financial services.

Brian Shoemaker consults for healthcare products companies in computer system validation, software quality assurance, and electronic records and signatures. He has conducted validation both on product software and on internal software, developed software quality systems, audited software quality processes (including agile methodology), and evaluated 21 CFR Part 11 compliance. He has had clients in clinical diagnostics, medical device engineering, medical imaging, medical-device fabrics manufacturing, contract lyophilization, clinical trial software, dental prosthetics, and bone-repair implants. He has worked with companies in Germany and Switzerland as well as the U.S.

Previous to founding ShoeBar Associates, Brian had quality roles at PPD Informatics, Doxis, Inc., and Behring Diagnostics, Inc. Brian earned his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Illinois; he has achieved the ASQ Software Quality Engineer certification.


Agile and Kanban 101 courses run from 6:00 to 6:45 during the networking period of the monthly meeting. A sign-up sheet is posted at 5:30 near the check-in table. Capacity is limited to 10 people per class, and sign-up  is first come, first served.


There will be no Kanban 101 session this month.

Quantifying the Cost of Delay: Sean Barrett

Oct 01,2015, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm,  Constant Contact , Waltham, MA: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

Sean Barrett

Sean Barrett

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Topic:

This session will be an interactive workshop. Participants will exercise the concepts to explore example and real world scenarios by attempting to quantify the potential value of those scenarios.

Quantifying Cost of Delay not only helps improve prioritization, but also helps with making trade-off decisions. It creates a healthy sense of urgency, and changes the focus of the conversation from efficiency and cost (which can encourage counterproductive behavior) to speed and value. If you’re interested in experimenting with Cost of Delay, but not sure how to get started, then this workshop is specifically for you!

About the speaker:

Sean Barrett is an Enterprise Agile Coach at Vistaprint in Waltham, MA. With twenty years of experience in technology, from startups to Financial giants, his Agile journey began in the Lean and Kanban space. While completing Emergn’s Expert Coaching Pathway, his awareness of and passion for the interconnected worlds of Agile, Lean, Organizational Agility and Lean Startup expanded rapidly. At Vistaprint Sean collaborates with a deeply committed team of Agilists to help the enterprise navigate an end to end transformation of their culture, mindset and practices. We are shifting our focus away from maximizing utilization, hitting promised dates, and delivering in big batches, to increasing quality through fast feedback, accelerating our time to market, and ensuring we’re concentrating on our highest value opportunities to delight our customers.

 

Chartering: Well Begun is Half Done: Chris Espy

Aug 06, 2015, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm,  Constant Contact , Waltham, MA: REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED

Chris Espy

Chris Espy

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Topic:

A sound team charter increases the likelihood of success for a team, project and organization. As Aristotle stated: “Well begun is half done.”

This presentation discusses how to develop consensus around objectives, vision and mission. We introduce the components of a good team charter, and examine how those components focus teammates on a common goal, and ensure that key questions are succinctly answered during the kickoff of an effort or a team. We review the various types of charters, and their recommended content.

In a workshop session you will participate in developing a team charter based on case studies and templates.

About the speaker:

Chris Espy is a Senior Program Manager and Agile Coach at SolutionsIQ. During a 25 year career in software development he has helped design and execute some of the largest enterprise Agile transformations ever attempted. Chris has developed and delivered numerous Agile classes, ranging from the broad “Basic Agile Program Management” to the very focused “Facilitating Agile Retrospectives”.

His professional certifications include Agile Certified Professional (PMI-ACP), Certified Scrum Professional (CSP), and Project Management Professional (PMP).